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Tuesday, November 08, 2005

Last word on schools for now (maybe)

Hi Jen, Andrea, & Mollie:

Is it fixable? I think so. Elcie has had the same "advocate" since she started her orthopedically handicapped pre-school at 3. We're blessed that he evidently loves his job and has stayed with it. He deserves many stars in his crown.

He oversees educational needs for all the "Elcies" in the county. When there is a problem he deals with the schools so the parents won't have to. He and I have worked together forever. He's much too polite to say this is a crock of **** but he was as angry as I. He has the final say on anything that affects "reasonable accommodation". He and I agree that exemption from the attendance requirement fall into that category.

I got caught in the middle because he had talked to the teacher, not the administrator, when this first surfaced. The school called me and the battle began. It wasn't the first and probably won't be the last.

An IEP is the ongoing plan for her education. It spells out yearly goals, and lists all the modifications needed for her to attain them. Attendance was never included because it never came up before and shouldn't have this time. He's sure we can change the IEP. That will fix it although it may cause some hard feelings.

If I were 20 years younger, home school might be an option but I know my own limitations. I'm spending so much time with Rebecca now that I just can't do any more. Elcie's classes aren't the problem anyway and, except for one year, her teachers have been great. She's not disabled enough to qualify for in home study with a tutor. (Another blessing - I wouldn't want that for her.)

I'm just waiting now to hear from one side or the other before I go on to the next step.

Thanks for all your concern. I was afraid I might be overreacting and the reinforcement from all my invisible friends out there helps.

5 comments:

L. said...

At the very least, it sounds as if you have a firm grasp of how the screwed-up system works, and what you have to do to slog your way through it. Imagine what it must be like for non-native English speakers... or just plain stupid people, of which this world has plenty. No wonder kids fall through the cracks.
Your kids are so lucky they have you. (Especially because you seem to feel that way about them, too!)

Uncle Roger said...

I'm glad to hear you have such a dedicated advocate. It's too bad the school is being problematic. Actually, all three kids have what they need most -- you. Keep up the good work!

btw, French is still there, only it's Kaiser now. (afaik)

Granny said...

What really fries me is the things they don't tell you. You have to read every word of everything they send home.

For example, you can opt out of standardized testing. They sure don't want us to know that.

ipodmomma said...

it's interesting about testing... we don't do any of that. the PSAT that my oldest two have taken is the first 'big' test they've ever had...

I know I take for granted the freedom we have over here... the UK has no real hard rules about homeschooling, and we do not fall under any particular US state's law... we are visited once a year by a guy from the North Yorkshire county council, who sits with the kids and goes over what they are learning. but we are not obliged to turn in any paperwork, dates of school year, etc...

so I read your blog with this sense of wonder and amazement... it's as though the welfare of kids and their actual education is secondary to the red tape and buearcracy involved.

I don't want to sound naive. I know that the kinds of things you go through with your girls exists, yet...

it still amazes me the insensitivity of those in positions of power, and how little they seem to regard the children and families involved...

oh, but really, who am I kidding?

okay. new topic, because I have a high horse that I occasionally get up on, and I'm a very poor rider... :)))

was going to make, or start to make a Christmas fruit cake tonight, but I am missing an orange...

will try again tomorrow...

have a good day!

mollie

ipodmomma said...

saw the link... oh yeah, that is so totally British!

basically, most people here send their kids to some kind of playgroup or preschool as soon as they are about 2 1/2 years old (toilet trained). then kids start kindergarten at 4 or 4 1/2, and are in school until the age of 16. then, if you are university bound, you stay for another two years to take A-levels... 4-5 classes for exams on those subjects. then you are tested, and those scores get you into uni.

if not uni bound, you leave school at 16, and either go to work, learn a trade, get pregnant or drop out...

the British govt, bless them, want to help in any way possible, except for getting people to actually do things for themselves...

it's so funny, because as an American, I have been brought up to believe you can pull yourself up from your bootstraps and get things sorted. here, that mentality does not exist. if you are poor and uneducated, the govt will take care of you. don't worry about being on the dole all your life, because that's the class you were born into . it's okay....

underneath all their words and schemes and such, that is really how it goes here. this new education plan is just another way of the govt trying to instill a sense of equality, yet if you know in your heart that your status in this nation has pretty much already been determined, and there is no real sense of failure or prejudice on being in a lower class, well, health care is free and schools are free and housing will be covered by the govt and this is how it has always been...

no one is up yet, and I just woke myself... lots of brain cells available... so many things I could add, but will save those for a later time, because I can feel that high horse is about ready to throw me off!


have a great day....

mollie